Hadrian's Arch

 

It was created in 131, as a symbolic border between Greek and Roman Athens.

Above the gate there are inscriptions:

- on the Greek side: "These are Athens, the city of Theseus",

- on the Roman side: "This is Hadrian's city, not Theseus."

Temple of Olympian Zeus

 

The building of the temple began in the 6th century BC. however, it was not completed then. Construction resumed in the second century BC, only Hadrian completed his work in 131, e. He also ordered, in the cell, the central place of the temple, set next to the statue of Zeus, also his own, though a bit smaller.

In 5th and 6th century. stone blocks were used to build a nearby church. The demolition of the temple was made until the eighteenth century.

Acropolis of Athens

 

always delight, at any time of the year as well as day and night. And although the ticket costs a lot, you have to see it not only from one of the hills.

And yet, neither the Acropolis nor the above-mentioned monuments are not everything you need to see here. You can not miss the Acropolis Museum, which is best to go during the day when it is open until late at night. You can not miss the National Archaeological Museum, which hides all the greatest monuments from all over Greece. You have to see Parliament, where a ceremonial change of the Evzon's guards takes place every hour. It's worth knowing what their dress means. The universities are beautiful here; Polytechnic, Academy and Library.

It is worth having a meal in one of the typical Greek taverns, get to know the taste of Greek kitchen. How to find it? Where are the next monuments?

Roman Agora of Athens

 

When the Romans captured Athens, one of the first investments was to build, in the first century BC, Roman Agora. In BC centuries it was definitely commercial. It was used primarily for trade. The entrance was through the gate that has been preserved to this day. To this day, it is also possible to read here the edict of Hadrian regulating the tax on oil sold.

Kerameikos

 

The district's name comes from patron of potters. In the 5th century BC the city walls were built, behind which was a cemetery for the richest townspeople. Buried here, among others Pericles, Solon or Demosthenes. In Kerameikos, the begging had the Holy Way, which the Panathenaic Procession followed during the Great Panathenaia holidays. Panatenaia is a holiday commemorating the birth of Athens. Peisistratos made them the chief Athens ceremony in the 6th century BC. The Great Panathenaia were the most solemn feast in ancient Athens. They began with an all-night vigil. In the morning, the young men raced with torches, run from the grove behind the city walls to the top of the Acropolis. Then began the procession of the entire Athens community from under the Dipylon Gate in Kerameikos to the Parthenon. There, on the Acropolis, great sacrifices were given, and the statue of Athens dressed in peplos. Subsequently, chariot races, horse races, athletics competitions and music contests took place, lasting several days. The celebrations also included a dance of naked men with only a helmet and shield to commemorate the victory of Athens over the giants.

The Ancient Agora of Athens

 

This is the square where public buildings were located. The townspeople gathered here to talk about the city's affairs. It was also a place of trade, meetings, discussions or prayers in front of the altar or in the temple. Public celebrations were held here. However, women did not come here. If they wanted to buy something, they sent men - slaves.

Ancient Agora dates back to 7th century BC so before Mycenaean times. In 6th century BC Solon transformed the area into Agora.

In 399 BC Socrates was judged here. For not worshiping the gods and calling for sexual abstinence, he was sentenced to death. Admittedly, the Athenian Popular Court offered the philosopher an admission of guilt and a penalty he himself had to offer, but he was uncompromising. So he was put in prison, where he could meet his students with whom he fought hard. After 30 days he was executed by drinking hemlock.

To this day, little has been left of buildings on Agora: a small, Byzantine church, Hephaestus and Stoa of Attalos.

Hadrian's Library

 

The building was built in 132. It was a very luxurious architectural ensemble of the city, it was a symbol of cultural power. Inside, there was a garden with a pool surrounded by a portico with over one hundred columns. More than 17,000 scrolls were stored in the building, there were reading rooms, discussion rooms and rhetoric exercises. The thick wall protected against external noise. Unfortunately, in 267 during the Herules invasion, the building was seriously damaged. In the third century, in the courtyard, a Christian church was built. The library itself fell into disrepair, to make matters worse the building was transformed into a bazaar. In the 19th century, there were military barracks here, and at the end of the century a great fire broke out, which consumed almost everything.

Acropolis of Athens

 

it was inhabited already in the second millennium BC, so in the Mycenaean period. A citadel stood there, surrounded by a thick wall. With time, the population inhabited the area around the Acropolis, and the hill itself became a place of worship for Greek gods. The buildings that we can admire today were created during the reign of Pericles. The greatest Athenian holiday was the Great Panathenaia (every four years) and Small Panathenaia (every year). The solemn procession began in Kerameikos to get to the acropolis here among singing and dancing. On the hill, games and competitions lasted for several days.

After the death, beloved by the Athenians, Pericles, the Acropolis fell into ever bigger ruin. Constant wars and occupations did not help in maintaining the magnificence of this place.

Athens is the cradle of our culture

 

The nucleus of the Polis was the hill Acropolis, on each, in the second millennium BC, Mycenaean stronghold was established. As the population grew, the city grew around so that a place of worship would be created on the hill itself. After the devastating invasion of the Persians in 480 BC, Athens quickly drew from the ruins. And when Pericles took power (443 ÷ 429 BC), a giant and the most famous monuments of ancient Athens were created.

One of Pericles' large undertakings was to set up walls from Piraeus to Athens and then around the city. It was to shelter the invaders. Paradoxically, it led death to his subordinates. Because the crowding of the population, in the absence of proper sanitation, led to epidemics. One of the victims was Pericles.

Guide to Athens

 

We have to see Athens - it is the cradle of our culture. The art of architects who lived several centuries before our era is astonishing today. From getting to know the beginning of the Acropolis, through getting to know no less important places. You need a guide to feel climate of the city. You can find here a guide to Athens in [pdf] format and map of connections. To see the most-preserved places, you should arrive for a minimum of five days. Here, green is wonderful during the winter, when there is no burning sun. With a little luck, you can dress lightly, even in coldest months of the year.

Hadrian's Arch

 

It was created in 131, as a symbolic border between Greek and Roman Athens.

Above the gate there are inscriptions:

- on the Greek side: "These are Athens, the city of Theseus",

- on the Roman side: "This is Hadrian's city, not Theseus."

Biblioteka Hadriana

 

   Gmach powstał w 132 r. n.e. Był to bardzo luksusowy zespół architektoniczny miasta, stanowił symbol kulturalnej potęgi. Wewnątrz znajdował się ogród z basenem otoczonym portykiem z ponad stoma kolumnami. W budynku przechowywano ponad 17 tysięcy zwojów, były tu czytelnie, pomieszczenia do dyskusji oraz ćwiczeń z retoryki. Gruby mur chronił przed hałasem z zewnątrz. Niestety w 267 r. podczas najazdu Herulów, budynek został poważnie uszkodzony. W V w n.e., na dziedzińcu, wybudowano kościół chrześcijański.       Sama biblioteka popadła w ruinę, na domiar złego budynek przekształcono w bazar. W XIX w. mieściły się tu wojskowe koszary, a pod koniec wieku wybuchł tu wielki pożar, który strawił prawie wszystko.

Ateny to kolebka naszej kultury

 

Zalążkiem polis było wzgórze Akropolis, na którym, w drugim tysiącleciu p.n.e., powstała mykeńska warownia. W miarę jak przyrastało mieszkańców, miasto rozrastało się wokół, by na samym wzniesieniu powstało miejsce kultu. Po niszczycielskim najeździe persów w 480 r. p.n.e., Ateny szybko powstawały ze zgliszcz. A gdy władzę przejął Perykles (443 r. p.n.e. ÷ 429 r. p.n.e.), powstały największe i najsłynniejsze zabytki starożytnych Aten.

Jednym z ogromnych przedsięwzięć Peryklesa było postawienie murów z Pireusu do Aten i dalej wokół miasta. Miało to dać schronienie przed najeźdźcami. Paradoksalnie, doprowadziło do śmierci wielu tysięcy istnień. Bowiem stłoczenie ludności, przy braku zapewnienia odpowiednich warunków sanitarnych, doprowadziło do wybuchu epidemii. Jedną z ofiar był Perykles.

Ateny

mitologia

bilety i komunikacja

mapa

przewodnik [pdf]

     Bardzo, bardzo dawno temu, gdy Kronos zajęty był władaniem niebem i ziemią, jego żona, Gaja leżąc u wybrzeży Attyki, bardzo się nudziła. A ponieważ była boginią, z własnej woli, poczęła dziecko. Urodziła dziwnego stwora, pół człowieka, pół węża. Nadała mu imię Kekrops. Pokochała go całym sercem i wychowała na walecznego myśliwego.

 Niestety, nie była w stanie bronić go przed ludźmi, którzy widzieli w nim dziwnego stwora i bardzo z niego szydzili i poniewierali.

     Lata mijały i Kekrops zapragnął żony, która by go kochała jak wcześniej matka. Ulepił z gliny kobietę. Dzięki możliwości magii, tchnął w nią życie. Żona urodziła mu trzy córki i jednego syna. Kochała swego męża i przekonała ludność, że Kekrops do dobry i mądry człowiek. Wkrótce zaczęto słuchać jego nauk: że warto żyć w monogamii, że warto uczyć się pisma, że trzeba grzebać zmarłych.

     I tak zjednał sobie przychylność wielu mieszkańców, którzy wkrótce wybrali go na swego króla. Pod rządami mądrego władcy, miasto stawało się coraz bogatsze i silniejsze. I wtedy zainteresowało się miastem dwoje bogów: Atena i Posejdon. Kekrops orzekł, że odda miasto temu z bogów, które da cenniejszy dar. Posejdon, jako władca mórz, uderzył trójzębem w skałę, z której popłynęła woda. Atena natomiast uderzyła włócznią w ziemię. W miejscu tym momentalnie urosło piękne drzewo oliwne. I to był dar, na który czekała ludność. Nie dość, że od bogini która jest znana z mądrości i sztuki wojowania, to dała miastu coś bardzo cennego. Oliwki wszak do dziś doceniają wszyscy.

     Legenda głosi, że drzewo które zrodziła bogini, to wciąż to samo, które rośnie przy Erechtejonie, na Akropolu.

 

Stadion Panatenajski w Atenach

Keramejkos

Zalążkiem polis było wzgórze Akropolis, na którym, w drugim tysiącleciu p.n.e., powstała mykeńska warownia. W miarę jak przyrastało mieszkańców, miasto rozrastało się wokół, by na samym wzniesieniu powstało miejsce kultu. Po niszczycielskim najeździe persów w 480 r. p.n.e., Ateny szybko powstawały ze zgliszcz. A gdy władzę przejął Perykles (443 r. p.n.e. ÷ 429 r. p.n.e.), powstały największe i najsłynniejsze zabytki starożytnych Aten.

Jednym z ogromnych przedsięwzięć Peryklesa było postawienie murów z Pireusu do Aten i dalej wokół miasta. Miało to dać schronienie przed najeźdźcami. Paradoksalnie, doprowadziło do śmierci wielu tysięcy istnień. Bowiem stłoczenie ludności, przy braku zapewnienia odpowiednich warunków sanitarnych, doprowadziło do wybuchu epidemii. Jedną z ofiar był Perykles.

Zalążkiem polis było wzgórze Akropolis, na którym, w drugim tysiącleciu p.n.e., powstała mykeńska warownia. W miarę jak przyrastało mieszkańców, miasto rozrastało się wokół, by na samym wzniesieniu powstało miejsce kultu. Po niszczycielskim najeździe persów w 480 r. p.n.e., Ateny szybko powstawały ze zgliszcz. A gdy władzę przejął Perykles (443 r. p.n.e. ÷ 429 r. p.n.e.), powstały największe i najsłynniejsze zabytki starożytnych Aten.

Jednym z ogromnych przedsięwzięć Peryklesa było postawienie murów z Pireusu do Aten i dalej wokół miasta. Miało to dać schronienie przed najeźdźcami. Paradoksalnie, doprowadziło do śmierci wielu tysięcy istnień. Bowiem stłoczenie ludności, przy braku zapewnienia odpowiednich warunków sanitarnych, doprowadziło do wybuchu epidemii. Jedną z ofiar był Perykles.

more monuments on the site

ATHENS MONUMENTS

Masz coś do dodania? Napisz do mnie przez formularz poniżej,

lub wyślij e'mail na adres:

kontakt@zwiedzo-maniacy.pl

Maybe you want to add something?

Or share something?

write in the forum or

send e'mail to the following address:

Your e-mail:
Message content:
send
send
Formularz został wysłany — dziękujemy.
Proszę wypełnić wszystkie wymagane pola!