Athens in the winter

słynny Grek Zorba

website being created

Wspomnienia Ateny

website being created

Everything comes from Greek

książki o Grecji

Athens lesser known

the greatest monuments of Athens part 1

the greatest monuments of Athens part 2

greek mythology

around Athens

Greek hits

history of Athens

Greek food

cheap food in Athens

memories of Zeus

souvenir from Greece

Athens with a teenager

website being created
website being created
website being created

ticket prices

map of Athens

Athens guidebook [pdf]

website being created

information on:

  • position,

  • ticket prices,

  • opening hours

  • other important monuments in and around Athens

you'll find in the tiles below


related links

Likavittos Hill

 

This is the best viewpoint in Athens. The highest one because it rises to 277 m above sea level. The view from here is unearthly, especially at sunset. And because you can see the whole capital of Greece from here, it is worth visiting this place to summarize the trip, so on the last day of your stay.

You can reach the summit on foot, you can take the cable car, which will take you quickly and without getting tired. However, I recommend taking a nice walk to experience the views. At the top there is a spacious observation deck, which in the evening literally bursts at the seams from the excess of tourists According to reports, in ancient times there was the temple of Zeus. Today there is a small, white church behind which, after descending a little down, is a restaurant, unfortunately very expensive.

Philopappos Hill in Athens

 

While a nice view of the Acropolis stretches from the Aeropagus Hill, from the top of the Philopappos hill, the largest monument of Greece, is seen with all its splendor. It is here, from the very morning, all day until dark, you can meet photographers who unfold cameras on tripods to capture the sunrise, sunset or a moment of this wonderful place. Philopappos is the popular name for Mouseion Hill (147 m a.s.l.), located near the Acropolis. At the very top there is a monumental tombstone monument, founded by residents, in the years 114 - 116 CE, for Philopappos, a Syrian prince who deserved as a benefactor of the city. In 1687, during the siege of Athens by the Venetians, the monument was damaged by a Turkish missile. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries archeological works were carried out near the monument, and the monument itself underwent a number of renovation works. The monument consists of a cube-shaped mausoleum and a huge, two-story facade crowning it. The lower part of the facade is decorated with a bas-relief depicting a solemn procession in which Philopappos, in consular dress, rides in a four-horse chariot. In the upper part there are niches with statues of Philopappos and his grandfather Antiochus IV. The right part of the facade, in which the statue of Seleucus and Nikator was, has not been preserved.

At the very bottom of the hill is "Socrates prison". It is a complex of three rooms carved into the rock and a water tank. Some accounts say that there was an ancient bathhouse here. The fact is, however, that during World War II antiques from the Acropolis were hidden here to protect them from looting and destruction.

At the bottom of the hill, from the Acropolis, there is also the inconspicuous little church of St. Demetrius "Loumbardiaris". 26. October 1656, on the eve of St. Demetrius, a Turkish commander who aimed to destroy everything that was Christian, set up powerful cannons on the Acropolis, the so-called Loumbardiaris. When he was prepared to strike, a lightning struck the Acropolis, blowing up the cannons, along with the entire gunpowder warehouse. Turkish soldiers along with their commander and his family were killed. The church Demetrius comes from the ninth century. It was renovated in 1955. Frescoes were discovered, partly destroyed and covered with newer decorations. During the restoration works, old paintings were discovered.

Athenian hills first of are just viewpoints. They offer a beautiful view of the entire city. Of course, the Acropolis is most often looked for, which, because it is also a hill, literally looks in all its glory. With little interest, I invite you to familiarize yourself with the history of these places, often very interesting.

Areopagus - Athens Hill

 

Ares Hill, in short called Areopagus. An inconspicuous, small hill - crowded with tourists during the day, so full of people at night that sometimes there is nowhere to stand. From here, there is a beautiful view of the nearby Acropolis, which is illuminated at night. This place has an important history. It is worth knowing that this is not just another viewpoint.

According to Greek mythology, the judgment of the Greek gods over Ares, the god of war, took place here. He killed Halirrhothios, son of Poseidon. Ares avoided punishment because he proved that the murder was retaliation for the abduction and raping his daughter.

On the same hill a court was held over Orestes, son of Agamemnon (great warrior, king of Mycenae, conqueror of the legendary Troy) and Clytemnestra (queen of Sparta). Clytemnestra killed her husband, whom she did not love, and who did her many harms. In revenge, for his father's murder, Orestes killed his mother. According to the law in force, it was the worst crime that a man could commit. Also the ancient goddesses of revenge, Erinyes, with snake hair, haunted him. The young man saw the bloody face of his murdered mother everywhere. Unable to cope with the delusions, he went to court of his own free will. Voting on the fate of the accused showed a balance of votes for acquittal and punishment. Orestes saved the additional voice of Apollo and Athena. For the gods, suicide is not as terrible a crime as patricide. As an example, Athena told about herself that Zeus gave her life, she never had a mother. These words had an impact on the fate of the accused, he was acquitted. Orestes, however, did not die a natural death: he died of a viper bite. History has shown that "Hekate, the powerful goddess of ancient powers, never forgives."

These events decided that the Supreme Council called Areopagus was meeting on this hill. It exercised the highest political and judicial power in the policy, that is in Athens. It controlled all offices. Courts were held here, convictions for the greatest offenses, such as murder, were passed. It was also a place of public gatherings. Agora Square was too loud to discuss important matters. In 49 CE here, none known a small Jew from Tarsus called Paul spoke here. He was storming at the sight of the city full of idols. Every day he met with philosophers, thinkers but also the most ordinary townspeople on the Areopagus. Unfortunately, when he talked about the Resurrection of the Lord, he was laughed at. However, there were a few who listened and discussed with St. Paul. This story is written in the book of Acts. Also here, on the hillside, in 1938, a bronze tablet was placed containing the Greek text of the Apostle's speech. At this table, on March 4, 2001, during a pilgrimage to Athens, John Paul II met with the Orthodox Patriarch of the Greek Church, the Archbishop of Athens and all of Greece. They both prayed here for reconciliation among Christians and for peace around the world.

     Bardzo, bardzo dawno temu, gdy Kronos zajęty był władaniem niebem i ziemią, jego żona, Gaja leżąc u wybrzeży Attyki, bardzo się nudziła. A ponieważ była boginią, z własnej woli, poczęła dziecko. Urodziła dziwnego stwora, pół człowieka, pół węża. Nadała mu imię Kekrops. Pokochała go całym sercem i wychowała na walecznego myśliwego.

 Niestety, nie była w stanie bronić go przed ludźmi, którzy widzieli w nim dziwnego stwora i bardzo z niego szydzili i poniewierali.

     Lata mijały i Kekrops zapragnął żony, która by go kochała jak wcześniej matka. Ulepił z gliny kobietę. Dzięki możliwości magii, tchnął w nią życie. Żona urodziła mu trzy córki i jednego syna. Kochała swego męża i przekonała ludność, że Kekrops do dobry i mądry człowiek. Wkrótce zaczęto słuchać jego nauk: że warto żyć w monogamii, że warto uczyć się pisma, że trzeba grzebać zmarłych.

     I tak zjednał sobie przychylność wielu mieszkańców, którzy wkrótce wybrali go na swego króla. Pod rządami mądrego władcy, miasto stawało się coraz bogatsze i silniejsze. I wtedy zainteresowało się miastem dwoje bogów: Atena i Posejdon. Kekrops orzekł, że odda miasto temu z bogów, które da cenniejszy dar. Posejdon, jako władca mórz, uderzył trójzębem w skałę, z której popłynęła woda. Atena natomiast uderzyła włócznią w ziemię. W miejscu tym momentalnie urosło piękne drzewo oliwne. I to był dar, na który czekała ludność. Nie dość, że od bogini która jest znana z mądrości i sztuki wojowania, to dała miastu coś bardzo cennego. Oliwki wszak do dziś doceniają wszyscy.

     Legenda głosi, że drzewo które zrodziła bogini, to wciąż to samo, które rośnie przy Erechtejonie, na Akropolu.

 

     Bardzo, bardzo dawno temu, gdy Kronos zajęty był władaniem niebem i ziemią, jego żona, Gaja leżąc u wybrzeży Attyki, bardzo się nudziła. A ponieważ była boginią, z własnej woli, poczęła dziecko. Urodziła dziwnego stwora, pół człowieka, pół węża. Nadała mu imię Kekrops. Pokochała go całym sercem i wychowała na walecznego myśliwego.

 Niestety, nie była w stanie bronić go przed ludźmi, którzy widzieli w nim dziwnego stwora i bardzo z niego szydzili i poniewierali.

     Lata mijały i Kekrops zapragnął żony, która by go kochała jak wcześniej matka. Ulepił z gliny kobietę. Dzięki możliwości magii, tchnął w nią życie. Żona urodziła mu trzy córki i jednego syna. Kochała swego męża i przekonała ludność, że Kekrops do dobry i mądry człowiek. Wkrótce zaczęto słuchać jego nauk: że warto żyć w monogamii, że warto uczyć się pisma, że trzeba grzebać zmarłych.

     I tak zjednał sobie przychylność wielu mieszkańców, którzy wkrótce wybrali go na swego króla. Pod rządami mądrego władcy, miasto stawało się coraz bogatsze i silniejsze. I wtedy zainteresowało się miastem dwoje bogów: Atena i Posejdon. Kekrops orzekł, że odda miasto temu z bogów, które da cenniejszy dar. Posejdon, jako władca mórz, uderzył trójzębem w skałę, z której popłynęła woda. Atena natomiast uderzyła włócznią w ziemię. W miejscu tym momentalnie urosło piękne drzewo oliwne. I to był dar, na który czekała ludność. Nie dość, że od bogini która jest znana z mądrości i sztuki wojowania, to dała miastu coś bardzo cennego. Oliwki wszak do dziś doceniają wszyscy.

     Legenda głosi, że drzewo które zrodziła bogini, to wciąż to samo, które rośnie przy Erechtejonie, na Akropolu.

 

Keramejkos

Biblioteka Hadriana

 

   Gmach powstał w 132 r. n.e. Był to bardzo luksusowy zespół architektoniczny miasta, stanowił symbol kulturalnej potęgi. Wewnątrz znajdował się ogród z basenem otoczonym portykiem z ponad stoma kolumnami. W budynku przechowywano ponad 17 tysięcy zwojów, były tu czytelnie, pomieszczenia do dyskusji oraz ćwiczeń z retoryki. Gruby mur chronił przed hałasem z zewnątrz. Niestety w 267 r. podczas najazdu Herulów, budynek został poważnie uszkodzony. W V w n.e., na dziedzińcu, wybudowano kościół chrześcijański.       Sama biblioteka popadła w ruinę, na domiar złego budynek przekształcono w bazar. W XIX w. mieściły się tu wojskowe koszary, a pod koniec wieku wybuchł tu wielki pożar, który strawił prawie wszystko.

Ateny to kolebka naszej kultury

 

Zalążkiem polis było wzgórze Akropolis, na którym, w drugim tysiącleciu p.n.e., powstała mykeńska warownia. W miarę jak przyrastało mieszkańców, miasto rozrastało się wokół, by na samym wzniesieniu powstało miejsce kultu. Po niszczycielskim najeździe persów w 480 r. p.n.e., Ateny szybko powstawały ze zgliszcz. A gdy władzę przejął Perykles (443 r. p.n.e. ÷ 429 r. p.n.e.), powstały największe i najsłynniejsze zabytki starożytnych Aten.

Jednym z ogromnych przedsięwzięć Peryklesa było postawienie murów z Pireusu do Aten i dalej wokół miasta. Miało to dać schronienie przed najeźdźcami. Paradoksalnie, doprowadziło do śmierci wielu tysięcy istnień. Bowiem stłoczenie ludności, przy braku zapewnienia odpowiednich warunków sanitarnych, doprowadziło do wybuchu epidemii. Jedną z ofiar był Perykles.

bilety i komunikacja

przewodnik [pdf]

Stadion Panatenajski w Atenach

Zalążkiem polis było wzgórze Akropolis, na którym, w drugim tysiącleciu p.n.e., powstała mykeńska warownia. W miarę jak przyrastało mieszkańców, miasto rozrastało się wokół, by na samym wzniesieniu powstało miejsce kultu. Po niszczycielskim najeździe persów w 480 r. p.n.e., Ateny szybko powstawały ze zgliszcz. A gdy władzę przejął Perykles (443 r. p.n.e. ÷ 429 r. p.n.e.), powstały największe i najsłynniejsze zabytki starożytnych Aten.

Jednym z ogromnych przedsięwzięć Peryklesa było postawienie murów z Pireusu do Aten i dalej wokół miasta. Miało to dać schronienie przed najeźdźcami. Paradoksalnie, doprowadziło do śmierci wielu tysięcy istnień. Bowiem stłoczenie ludności, przy braku zapewnienia odpowiednich warunków sanitarnych, doprowadziło do wybuchu epidemii. Jedną z ofiar był Perykles.

Zalążkiem polis było wzgórze Akropolis, na którym, w drugim tysiącleciu p.n.e., powstała mykeńska warownia. W miarę jak przyrastało mieszkańców, miasto rozrastało się wokół, by na samym wzniesieniu powstało miejsce kultu. Po niszczycielskim najeździe persów w 480 r. p.n.e., Ateny szybko powstawały ze zgliszcz. A gdy władzę przejął Perykles (443 r. p.n.e. ÷ 429 r. p.n.e.), powstały największe i najsłynniejsze zabytki starożytnych Aten.

Jednym z ogromnych przedsięwzięć Peryklesa było postawienie murów z Pireusu do Aten i dalej wokół miasta. Miało to dać schronienie przed najeźdźcami. Paradoksalnie, doprowadziło do śmierci wielu tysięcy istnień. Bowiem stłoczenie ludności, przy braku zapewnienia odpowiednich warunków sanitarnych, doprowadziło do wybuchu epidemii. Jedną z ofiar był Perykles.

Biblioteka Hadriana

 

   Gmach powstał w 132 r. n.e. Był to bardzo luksusowy zespół architektoniczny miasta, stanowił symbol kulturalnej potęgi. Wewnątrz znajdował się ogród z basenem otoczonym portykiem z ponad stoma kolumnami. W budynku przechowywano ponad 17 tysięcy zwojów, były tu czytelnie, pomieszczenia do dyskusji oraz ćwiczeń z retoryki. Gruby mur chronił przed hałasem z zewnątrz. Niestety w 267 r. podczas najazdu Herulów, budynek został poważnie uszkodzony. W V w n.e., na dziedzińcu, wybudowano kościół chrześcijański.       Sama biblioteka popadła w ruinę, na domiar złego budynek przekształcono w bazar. W XIX w. mieściły się tu wojskowe koszary, a pod koniec wieku wybuchł tu wielki pożar, który strawił prawie wszystko.

Ateny to kolebka naszej kultury

 

Zalążkiem polis było wzgórze Akropolis, na którym, w drugim tysiącleciu p.n.e., powstała mykeńska warownia. W miarę jak przyrastało mieszkańców, miasto rozrastało się wokół, by na samym wzniesieniu powstało miejsce kultu. Po niszczycielskim najeździe persów w 480 r. p.n.e., Ateny szybko powstawały ze zgliszcz. A gdy władzę przejął Perykles (443 r. p.n.e. ÷ 429 r. p.n.e.), powstały największe i najsłynniejsze zabytki starożytnych Aten.

Jednym z ogromnych przedsięwzięć Peryklesa było postawienie murów z Pireusu do Aten i dalej wokół miasta. Miało to dać schronienie przed najeźdźcami. Paradoksalnie, doprowadziło do śmierci wielu tysięcy istnień. Bowiem stłoczenie ludności, przy braku zapewnienia odpowiednich warunków sanitarnych, doprowadziło do wybuchu epidemii. Jedną z ofiar był Perykles.

mitologia

bilety i komunikacja

mapa

przewodnik [pdf]

Stadion Panatenajski w Atenach

Keramejkos

Zalążkiem polis było wzgórze Akropolis, na którym, w drugim tysiącleciu p.n.e., powstała mykeńska warownia. W miarę jak przyrastało mieszkańców, miasto rozrastało się wokół, by na samym wzniesieniu powstało miejsce kultu. Po niszczycielskim najeździe persów w 480 r. p.n.e., Ateny szybko powstawały ze zgliszcz. A gdy władzę przejął Perykles (443 r. p.n.e. ÷ 429 r. p.n.e.), powstały największe i najsłynniejsze zabytki starożytnych Aten.

Jednym z ogromnych przedsięwzięć Peryklesa było postawienie murów z Pireusu do Aten i dalej wokół miasta. Miało to dać schronienie przed najeźdźcami. Paradoksalnie, doprowadziło do śmierci wielu tysięcy istnień. Bowiem stłoczenie ludności, przy braku zapewnienia odpowiednich warunków sanitarnych, doprowadziło do wybuchu epidemii. Jedną z ofiar był Perykles.

Zalążkiem polis było wzgórze Akropolis, na którym, w drugim tysiącleciu p.n.e., powstała mykeńska warownia. W miarę jak przyrastało mieszkańców, miasto rozrastało się wokół, by na samym wzniesieniu powstało miejsce kultu. Po niszczycielskim najeździe persów w 480 r. p.n.e., Ateny szybko powstawały ze zgliszcz. A gdy władzę przejął Perykles (443 r. p.n.e. ÷ 429 r. p.n.e.), powstały największe i najsłynniejsze zabytki starożytnych Aten.

Jednym z ogromnych przedsięwzięć Peryklesa było postawienie murów z Pireusu do Aten i dalej wokół miasta. Miało to dać schronienie przed najeźdźcami. Paradoksalnie, doprowadziło do śmierci wielu tysięcy istnień. Bowiem stłoczenie ludności, przy braku zapewnienia odpowiednich warunków sanitarnych, doprowadziło do wybuchu epidemii. Jedną z ofiar był Perykles.

PL

EN

Masz coś do dodania? Napisz do mnie przez formularz poniżej,

lub wyślij e'mail na adres:

kontakt@zwiedzo-maniacy.pl

Maybe you want to add something?

Or share something?

write in the forum or

send e'mail to the following address:

Your e-mail:
Message content:
send
send
Formularz został wysłany — dziękujemy.
Proszę wypełnić wszystkie wymagane pola!